WELCOME FRIENDS!!

WELCOME  FRIENDS!!
HUMMINGBIRD MIGRATION 2014

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

UP * UP * AND AWAY AT THE HUMMINGBIRD MIGRATION HIGHLIGHT REVIEW OF 9 26 C 2





Hi Everybody!!
Would you like to fly? When I was a little kid, I would try to fly like the birds. I would repeatedly jump and try to fly away with them. Needless to say, I did not fly! Turns out I did not want to fly like humans (inside a rocket ship) as they are so small and confining! Of course, no one at NASA would let old Granny have a go at the controls! Anyway, after a long lifetime of flying failure, I have finally learned how to fly:  sit in a comfy chair and watch "Earthflight" *! I got this Video for Christmas and watch it often. I suggest anyone who likes birds should view this extraordinary work. Today's photostudy is more views of the hummers flying through the air with the greatest of ease! Enjoy! 

*
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthflight
Earthflight is a British nature documentary that shows a flight from the view of the wings of birds across six continents, showing some of the world's greatest natural spectacles from a bird's-eye view.[1] The BBC series was created by John Downer and narrated by David Tennant and consisted of six 60-minute episodes. The first episode aired on BBC One on 29 December 2011.
      To fly like a bird, Earthflight not only captured remarkable images of wild flocks but also relied on some extraordinary relationships between people and birds. Filmed over four years, in six continents and more than 40 countries, the Earthflight team used many extraordinary techniques. For some of the unique flying shots, members of the team became part of the flock. The birds followed wherever they went - even in a microlight over Edinburgh and London. In Africa, paragliders floated alongside wild vultures, while a model vulture carried a camera inside the flock. In South America, wild-living macaws, that were rescued as babies, still come back to visit their 'foster mother' as he travels along a jungle river. In Africa, a radio-controlled 'drone' silently infiltrates masses of pink flamingos without disturbing a feather, and microlights and helicopters capture the dramatic moment white storks arrive over Istanbul. In Africa a tame vulture carried a camera across the African bush and recreated the behaviour of his wild relatives.























































































































...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See you next time!



O+O