WELCOME FRIENDS!!

WELCOME  FRIENDS!!
HUMMINGBIRD MIGRATION 2014

Friday, October 17, 2014

THE HUMMINGBIRD MIGRATION 2014 AND CLASSIFICATION OF MODERN BIRD ORDERS




Hi Everybody!!
Here are the highlight photos of August 30 B showing the increased activity around the feeders. The dark heads are the breeder males sitting down together and showing off for the girls! The displayed  social behavior is not usually documented, as the current trend lists these birds as solitary.I have witnessed for years at this location a meeting place where the birds are very social. Of course, posting the birds to Social Media Sites has definitely helped their socialization! My hummingbirds have been 'Google Hummingbirds' for over 5 years living in my G+ Photo Albums and past Blogs. Please visit anytime. Thank you all for flying the little birds around the world. Enjoy!














Link to photostudy of August 30 B in G+ Photo Albums:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117645114459863049265/albums/6065802892126628081

















https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird

Bird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Classification of modern bird orders

See also: List of birds
Aves


Neognathae


Neoaves

Opisthocomiformes (hoatzin)




Mesitornithidae (mesites)


Pteroclidiformes (sandgrouses)




Phaethontidae (tropicbirds)


Eurypygae (sunbittern, kagu)




Columbiformes (pigeons)


Mirandornithes (flamingos and grebes)



Strisores (hummingbirds, swifts)


Insolitavis


Cuculiformes (cuckoos)


Otididae (bustards)


Gruiformes (rails and cranes)




Musophagidae (turacos)


Aequornithes (loons, penguins, herons, pelicans, storks, etc)



Litoritelluraves

Charadriiformes (shorebirds)

Telluraves
Afroaves





Strigiformes (owls)


Coliiformes (mousebirds)


Eucavitaves

Leptosomatiformes (cuckoo roller)

Cavitaves

Trogoniformes(trogons)

Picocoraciae

Bucerotiformes(hornbills, hoopoe and wood hoopoes)












Australavis

Cariamae (seriemas)

Eufalconimorphae

Falconidae(falcons)

Psittacopasserae

Psittaciformes(parrots)


Passeriformes(songbirds and kin)









Cladogram of modern bird relationships based on Kimball, R.T. et al. (2013)[41] and Yury, T. et al. (2013).[42]
The classification of birds is a contentious issue. Sibley and Ahlquist's Phylogeny and Classification of Birds (1990) is a landmark work on the classification of birds,[43] although it is frequently debated and constantly revised. Most evidence seems to suggest the assignment of orders is accurate,[44] but scientists disagree about the relationships between the orders themselves; evidence from modern bird anatomy, fossils and DNA have all been brought to bear on the problem, but no strong consensus has emerged. More recently, new fossil and molecular evidence is providing an increasingly clear picture of the evolution of modern bird orders.
This is a list of the taxonomic orders in the subclass Neornithes, or modern birds. This list uses the traditional classification (the so-called Clements order), revised by the Sibley-Monroe classification. The list of birds gives a more detailed summary of the orders, including families.
Subclass Neornithes
The subclass Neornithes has two extant superorders –
Superorder Palaeognathae:
The name of the superorder is derived from paleognath, the ancient Greek for "old jaws" in reference to the skeletal anatomy of the palate, which is described as more primitive and reptilian than that in other birds. The Palaeognathae consists of three orders that comprise 49 existing species.
Superorder Neognathae:
The superorder Neognathae comprises 27 orders that have a total of nearly 10,000 species. The Neognathae have undergone adaptive radiation to produce the staggering diversity of form (especially of the bill and feet), function, and behaviour that are seen today.
The orders comprising the Neognathae are:
The radically different Sibley-Monroe classification (Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy), based on molecular data, found widespread adoption in a few aspects, as recent molecular, fossil, and anatomical evidence supported the Galloanserae.[39]























...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See you next time! Thanks for coming by to see the hummingbirds!

O+O